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Month: May 2014

19 of Maya Angelou's Most Powerful Quotes to Remember Her By

19 of Maya Angelou's Most Powerful Quotes to Remember Her By

May 28, 2014 Best known for her poems and essays, Maya Angelou was a Rennaisance woman. She died on Wednesday at the age of 86. As a poet, author, playwright, director, performer, actress, professor, producer, singer and civil right’s activist, “I have created myself,” she told USA Today. “I have taught myself so much.” Many of us read her best known book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, in school. Published in 1969, it lyrically recounted her years growing…

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How To Benefit From Nutritious Sesame Seeds

How To Benefit From Nutritious Sesame Seeds

Diana Herrington    May 25, 2014 “Open Sesame!” were the words spoken by Ali Baba in the Arabian Nights to open the door to the robbers’ treasure. Open Sesame, describes how the sesame seed pod bursts open when it reaches maturity. Sesame is known in Africa as “benne” or good luck. From what we learned in the 20 Huge Health Benefits of Sesame, we can have lots of good luck in our body by eating them. Sesame seeds are not…

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Early Fitness Preserves Thinking Skills 25 Years Later

Early Fitness Preserves Thinking Skills 25 Years Later

Even if you are already in middle age or later, the study has some good news. Young adults who are in good physical shape performed better in cognitive tests 25 years later, a new study finds. The study, published in the journal Neurology, also found that even if you didn’t get too much exercise in your youth, it’s never too late to start, as the benefits can still be seen later on. One of the study’s authors, David R. Jacobs,…

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Light exercise linked to less disability

Light exercise linked to less disability

By Ronnie Cohen     NEW YORK     Thu May 22, 2014 A woman jogs along the Charles River on an early spring evening in Boston, Massachusetts April 3, 2014. (Reuters Health) – People who engage in plenty of light movement have a lower risk of developing a disability and losing their capacity to care for themselves, a new study suggests. The study included middle-aged and older adults who had knee osteoarthritis or were at high risk of developing the condition. It focused…

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Stressful relationships may raise risk of death

Stressful relationships may raise risk of death

By Shereen Jegtvig     NEW YORK     Mon May 26, 2014 (Reuters Health) – Worries, conflicts and demands in relationships with friends, family and neighbors may contribute to an earlier death suggests a new Danish study. “Conflicts, especially, were associated with higher mortality risk regardless of whom was the source of the conflict,” the authors write. “Worries and demands were only associated with mortality risk if they were related to partner or children.” Men and people without jobs seemed to be the…

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Your "Gluten Intolerance" May Actually Be From Something Else in Wheat

Your "Gluten Intolerance" May Actually Be From Something Else in Wheat

Sarah Zhang Oh gluten, the least trendy protein of our time. As gluten-free has transcended science and exploded into diet fad, scientists increasingly suspect that gluten intolerance—apart from actual celiac disease—doesn’t exist at all. The true culprit could be a group of carbohydrates, including one in wheat called fructan. A new story from NPR’s Eliza Barclay does an impressive job of summarizing the recent history of gluten research, which you can be forgiven for finding confusing. In fact, Peter Gibson,…

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Everyday Psychology You Should Probably Know

Everyday Psychology You Should Probably Know

1. Sex, danger, and food are meant to draw your attention Your brain is hardwired to stay safe, reproduce, and eat as a means of survival. Everything else is secondary. 2. Just because you haven’t doesn’t mean you can’t You have a mental model for just about everything. This allows you to use past experience and intuitive perceptions to do things you’ve never tried. 3. You see what you expect to see How we perceive what we see is heavily…

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Forgiveness: The Wonderful Psychological Perks

Forgiveness: The Wonderful Psychological Perks

Studies show that being forgiving benefits mental and physical health. “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” — Mahatma Gandhi It’s often said that you should ‘forgive and forget’ other people’s transgressions, no matter how hard that may be. It’s certainly true that forgiving others is beneficial to the self, as the author of a new study on the subject, Saima Noreen, explains: “It is well established that learning to forgive others can have positive…

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Diet Tied to Better Breathing in COPD Patients

Diet Tied to Better Breathing in COPD Patients

Study suggests healthy eating might help improve lung function By Amy Norton    HealthDay Reporter   WebMD News from HealthDay WEDNESDAY, May 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) – People with certain chronic lung diseases might breathe a bit easier when their diets contain healthy foods like fruits and fish, a new study suggests. Researchers found that among nearly 2,200 adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), those who ate fish, grapefruit, bananas and cheese tended to have better lung function and fewer symptoms…

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Anti-bacterial soaps under scrutiny as Minnesota bans triclosan

Anti-bacterial soaps under scrutiny as Minnesota bans triclosan

Erin Anderssen    The Globe and Mail   Wednesday, May. 21 2014 While health agencies continue to review the safety of the chemical in anti-bacterial soap, the state of Minnesota has decided to ban the germ-killer triclosan. The new law will not take effect until 2017, but it’s a first step in North America amidst growing concern about the potential hazards of the chemical, which is added to soap, body washes and even toothpaste. Triclosan has been widely use in consumer products…

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