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Month: November 2019

Why Being Thankful Is So Good For Your Health

Why Being Thankful Is So Good For Your Health

As a physician, I have helped to care for many patients and families whose lives have been turned upside down by serious illnesses and injuries. In the throes of such catastrophes, it can be difficult to find cause for anything but lament. Yet Thanksgiving presents us with an opportunity to develop one of the healthiest, most life-affirming and convivial of all habits — that of counting and rejoicing in our blessings. Gratitude’s benefits Research shows that grateful people tend to…

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5 Food Pairings For Maximum Nutritional Benefits

5 Food Pairings For Maximum Nutritional Benefits

Food combining can do more than soothe a fussy tummy. Pairing certain nutrient profiles has the potential to add up to improved absorption—and better health (while some pairings can worsen digestion). Follow these formulas for maximum nutritional benefits at every meal. 1. HUMMUS + RED PEPPER = BOOST FOR LOW IRON “The majority of dietary iron comes from nonheme, or plant, sources, but unfortunately, it’s not usually well absorbed,” says Peggy Kotsopoulos, a New York City–based holistic nutritionist. However, vitamin…

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Doctors Now Prescribing Music Therapy

Doctors Now Prescribing Music Therapy

Doctors Now Prescribing Music Therapy for Heart Ailments, Brain Dysfunction, Learning Disabilities, Depression, PTSD, Alzheimers, Childhood Development and More Music has proven time and again to be an important component of human culture. From its ceremonial origin to modern medical usage for personal motivation, concentration, and shifting mood, music is a powerful balm for the human soul. Though traditional “music therapy” encompasses a specific set of practices, the broader use of music as a therapeutic tool can be seen nowadays…

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Exercise May Help Ward Off Depression

Exercise May Help Ward Off Depression

Even If You’re Genetically Prone to It An extra 35 minutes of exercise per day was tied to a reduced likelihood of experiencing depression. Getting a few hours of exercise a week may reduce the risk of depression, even in people who are genetically prone to the condition, a new study suggests. The authors found that, although certain genes boost a person’s risk of depression, increased levels of exercise essentially canceled out this genetic risk. Overall, for every 4 hours…

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