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Tag: cognition

Blueberries May Help Reduce Your Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease: It’s All About The Anthocyanins

Blueberries May Help Reduce Your Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease: It’s All About The Anthocyanins

Blueberries deliver the most delicious wallop of vitamin C found on the planet (in my humble opinion). One serving supplies 25 percent of your daily C requirement plus additional heart-healthy fiber and manganese, important to bone health. A super-achiever when it comes to antioxidant strength, this fruit may also lower your risk of heart disease, cancer, and, new research suggests, even Alzheimer’s disease. A team of University of Cincinnati scientists led by Dr. Robert Krikorian says the healthful antioxidants within…

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Some Video Games Are Good For Older Adults’ Brains

Some Video Games Are Good For Older Adults’ Brains

If you’re between 55 and 75 years old, you may want to try playing 3D platform games like Super Mario 64 to stave off mild cognitive impairment and perhaps even prevent Alzheimer’s disease. That’s the finding of a new Canadian study by Université de Montréal psychology professors Gregory West, Sylvie Belleville and Isabelle Peretz. Published in PLOS ONE, it was done in cooperation with the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal (IUGM), Benjamin Rich Zendel of Memorial University in Newfoundland,…

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Loneliness Even Unhealthier Than Obesity

Loneliness Even Unhealthier Than Obesity

Loneliness Even Unhealthier Than Obesity, Should Be A Public Health Priority: Psychologist Loneliness should be a major public health concern, according to an American psychologist. Loneliness is a major health risk, like obesity or smoking, and public health programs should address it in the same way, says a psychologist. New research by Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, found that social isolation contributes as strongly to mortality as does smoking 15 cigarettes a day….

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Breathe and Focus: How Practicing Mindfulness Improves Mental Health as We Age

Breathe and Focus: How Practicing Mindfulness Improves Mental Health as We Age

As we age, it’s natural to worry about possible declines in our mental and brain health. Many older adults are concerned about things like memory loss and poorer attention, forgetting names, and taking longer to learn new things. As a result, as we get older we may feel more distress, sadness, and/ or anxiety that can decrease our quality of life. However, we can do something to address these concerns. The answer is mindfulness. Research shows that it can improve…

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The Best Mindset To Preserve Memory And Judgement

The Best Mindset To Preserve Memory And Judgement

The best mindset to ward off cognitive decline can be cultivated using exercises such as visualising your best possible self. Older adults with a more optimistic outlook experience fewer memory and judgement problems, new research finds. Optimism has also been linked to desirable health behaviours like: Eating more healthily. Exercising regularly. Lower risk of heart conditions and stroke. For the study, researchers followed around 500 older adults over four years to see if they experienced any cognitive impairments. The results…

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Best Supplement To Improve IQ By 10%

Best Supplement To Improve IQ By 10%

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) — an omega-3 fatty acid — can improve IQ by 10%, new research finds. People in the study, who were aged over 65, were given 2g/day of DHA for a year. A control group was given a placebo of corn oil. The high quality study involved 240 Chinese individuals. Their IQ and other measures of cognitive function were tested after 6 and 12 months. The study’s authors explain the results: “…oral DHA supplementation (2 g/d) for 12 months…

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Keep Busy! Stay Sharp!

Keep Busy! Stay Sharp!

Study suggests a full schedule may enhance your mental prowess By Amy Norton    HealthDay Reporter   WebMD News from HealthDay TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) – Although people complain when their schedule gets too busy, new research suggests that being overbooked might actually be good for the brain. The study of older adults found that those with packed schedules tended to do better on tests of memory, information processing and reasoning. Researchers said the findings don’t prove that…

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Certain Foods Can Damage Your Ability To Think Flexibly

Certain Foods Can Damage Your Ability To Think Flexibly

A high-fat, high-sugar diet causes significant damage to cognitive flexibility, a new study finds. Cognitive flexibility is the ability to adjust and adapt to changing situations. The high-sugar diet was most damaging, the research on mice found. This caused impairments in both long- and short-term memory. This is just the latest in a line of studies showing the potentially dramatic effects of diet on mental performance. Professor Kathy Magnusson, who co-led the study, said: “The impairment of cognitive flexibility in…

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20 Everyday Activities That Keep Memory and Thinking Sharp

20 Everyday Activities That Keep Memory and Thinking Sharp

These 20 activities have been linked to reduced risk of developing memory and thinking problems. Computer use, as well as socialising and doing arts and crafts in middle age may help preserve memory in later years, a new study suggests. The research, published in the journal Neurology, asked 256 seniors to report how often they took part in various everyday activities (Peterson et al., 2015). None of the people, whose average age was 87, had memory and thinking problems at…

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Just two daily servings containing vital nutrients is enough to reduce brain age by 11 years.

Just two daily servings containing vital nutrients is enough to reduce brain age by 11 years.

Eating green leafy vegetables could reduce brain age by around eleven years, a new study finds. Vitamin K in foods like mustard greens, spinach, kale and collards have been linked to slower cognitive decline for the first time. Professor Martha Clare Morris, a nutritional epidemiologist who led the research, said: “Losing one’s memory or cognitive abilities is one of the biggest fears for people as they get older. Since declining cognitive ability is central to Alzheimer’s disease and dementias, increasing…

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